Tutankhamun

Tutankhamun: Experts claim material of King Tut’s dagger may have come from outer space

Interesting

According to ancient Egyptian history, Pharaohs were the highest ruler of the people and were regarded gods on earth, acting as a mediator between the gods and the people. Tutankhamun is one of Egypt’s most studied and examined individuals, and there are various mysteries surrounding him that have sparked the attention of archaeologists and specialists all over the world.

However, a group of experts claims to have solved an old enigma involving a knife that belonged to King Tut almost 3,400 years ago. For decades, the dagger’s origins and how it was made have remained one of history’s biggest mysteries.

Archaeologists were taken aback when they discovered a gold-hilted blade in King Tut’s tomb was composed of a substance produced in space. Two new studies present opposing visions of the mystery weapon’s origins, which may have been used by probably the most renowned ancient Egyptian king.

One of the investigations on the dagger, which is composed of iron from meteorites, implies it was produced in Anatolia (modern-day Turkey), while the second research says its Earthly origins are unknown.

Tutankhamun was one of the pharaohs who ascended to the throne following the death of his father, Akhenaten. Akhenaten was a divisive pharaoh. Except for one named Aten, he prohibited all gods. The populace was outraged by this development and destroyed many of Akhenaten’s sculptures and monuments following his death.

Tutankhamun ascended to the throne at the age of nine or ten. Because he was so young, he was surrounded by great counsellors who assisted him in ruling Egypt. Many of his father’s actions were reversed by Tutankhamun. People were permitted to re-worship the ancient gods, and ruined temples were restored. He relocated Egypt’s capital to Thebes.

Iron smelting had not yet been created during King Tutankhamun’s reign (1333 B.C. to 1323 B.C.), hence metal was a rare and costly commodity that often came from meteorites.

According to scientists, the components utilised to manufacture the weapon may have come from space.

Since its discovery in 1925, three years after the discovery of the Egyptian pharaoh’s substantially complete tomb in the Valley of the Kings in Luxor, the relic has been a costly study material for researchers. A team of researchers discovered the sword tied to the mummified ruler’s right thigh in 1925. Experts think King Tut died of sickle cell anaemia when he was 19 years old.

That was no ordinary dagger. It was discovered enclosed in a gold sheath with a design of flowers, feathers, and a jackal’s head. Another gold blade was discovered under King Tut’s covering on his belly. The larger blade was made out of iron, a process the Egyptians did not learn until over 500 years after King Tutankhamun’s death. As a result, experts assume that the components utilised in the blade did not come from Earth.

By 2016, the experts had discovered that the chemical makeup of the blade indicated that it had been fashioned using components from an iron meteorite that had collided with Earth. Further investigation by a team from Japan’s Chiba Institute of Technology has confirmed that the materials were most likely from space. The gold hilt appears to have been made using lime plaster, a type of adhesive.

Further investigation by a team from Japan’s Chiba Institute of Technology has confirmed that the materials were most likely from space. The gold hilt appears to have been made using lime plaster, a type of glue.

The study’s findings have now been published in the journal Meteoritics & Planetary Science.